housing program

No shelter for disabled gunshot victim on dialysis

UPDATE, 10/24/12: Great news! Today, my friend is moving to a very nice nursing facility where he will be able to have rehabilitation for the injuries he sustained when he was shot. My understanding is that he can stay there for as long as he needs to. Thank you to all who prayed for him! God answers prayer! :)

After more than a decade of ministering to homeless people, I’m accustomed to difficult situations and heartbreaking stories, but this one stands out. Posted today on our StreetWatch homeless outreach team’s Facebook page [slightly edited for clarity]:

Please pray for a disabled homeless man on dialysis who’s in the hospital — he was a victim of a drive-by shooting — and has nowhere to go upon discharge. He also has multiple other serious health problems. He recently stayed at Greensboro Urban Ministry’s shelter, whose rules do not allow him to return for six months. (We have asked for an exemption because of his circumstances, but it was denied.) He was shot on the street, shortly after his time ended at the shelter.

He needs to be in Greensboro to continue his dialysis. Because of his health problems and safety needs, it would be very dangerous for him to try to sleep outside again. His multiple complicate the situation, and thus far, social workers have not been able to find a place for him to go when he leaves the hospital.

He is eligible for a housing voucher or supportive housing program, but we are unaware of any openings in these programs. He’s had a hard life and he’s in a hard situation. We believe that God makes a way where there’s no way, and I’ve been visiting him and praying that with and for him. Please pray that with us! Thank you, friends.

Guilford County homeless providers receive $1.4 million

HUD recently awarded renewal funds for existing homeless programs as part of the Fiscal Year 2010 Continuum of Care Grants. Homeless service providers in Guilford County received a total of $1,449,318 — a modest increase of $8,244 overall from 2009. Most homeless service providers received the same funding as last year. With non-profits scrambling to find money in a depressed economy, the HUD grant awards are welcome news.

Here is a list of the Guilford County providers who received renewal funding, along with the amount each received this year and last year:

HOMELESS SERVICE PROVIDER PROGRAM NAME 2009 HUD AWARD 2010 HUD AWARD
Alcohol and Drug Services of Guilford, Inc.

Project Home Front

SHP

$34,996

$34,996

Family Service of the Piedmont, Inc.

Clara House: emergency shelter for women and children escaping domestic violence in Greensboro

SHP

$70,218

$70,218

Greensboro Housing Authority

Grace Homes: housing program for chronically homeless single adults with physical, mental or substance abuse disabilities in Greensboro

S+CR

$0

$21,996

Greensboro Housing Authority Home at Last: permanent
supportive housing program for homeless people in Greensboro

S+CR

$121,548 $0
Greensboro Housing Authority

Housing Opportunities: permanent supportive housing program for homeless people in
Greensboro

SHP

$477,369

$477,369

Greensboro Housing Authority

Mary’s Homes: scattered site
single-family homes in High Point for homeless, substance abusing mothers in recovery, and their children

S+CR

$316,152

$423,948

Greensboro Urban Ministry

Partnership Village:
transitional housing for formerly homeless individuals and
families in Greensboro

SHP

$59,850

$59,850

Joseph’s House, Inc.

Joseph’s House Young Adult Independent Living
Program:
permanent, supportive housing program for homeless young adults in Greensboro who are: 1) chronically homeless, or 2) victims of domestic violence, or 3)
disabled

SHP

$43,730

$43,730

Mary’s House, Inc.

Mary’s House: transitional
housing for mothers in recovery from substance abuse, and their
minor children; located in Greensboro

SHP

$135,982

$135,982

Open Door Ministries of High Point, Inc.

Arthur Cassell Memorial Transitional Housing
Program:
transitional living facility in High Point for homeless recovering addicts and alcoholics

SHP

$48,919

$48,919

Open Door Ministries of High Point, Inc.

HMIS – High Point: homeless management information system

SHP

$13,750

$13,750

The Salvation Army

Case Management/After-Care

SHP

$19,274

$19,274

The Servant Center, Inc.

Servant House: transitional housing program for disabled homeless men in Greensboro

SHP

$47,586

$47,586

Youth Focus Inc.

Youth Focus Transitional Living Program :
serves homeless young women in Greensboro ages 16-21

SHP

$51,700

$51,700

$1,441,074

$1,449,318

NOTES (from HUD.gov):

  • S+CR: Shelter Plus Care Program provides rental assistance for hard-to-serve homeless persons with disabilities in connection with supportive services funded from sources outside the program.
  • SHP: The Supportive Housing Program helps develop housing and related supportive services for people moving from homelessness to independent living. Program funds help homeless people live in a stable place, increase their skills and their income, and gain more control over the decisions that affect their lives.

» Click here to see all 2010 grant awards of HUD’s web site.

 

When there’s nowhere to go

I wrote about the guys on the block (and more) for the News & Record: “When there’s nowhere to go,” by Michele Forrest; published Sunday, Nov. 1, 2009. It’s online here, and reposted below:

My ministry partner, Audrie Keen, and I provide a street outreach to the homeless in Greensboro, and we’ve made a lot of friends along the way. We eat together, go to church together and have cookouts. Sometimes our homeless friends stay with us. We visit formerly homeless friends in their homes.

When we say “homeless friends,” we really mean friends.

Two Friday mornings ago, we visited “The Block” at Lee and South Eugene streets. It had been 11 days since my last visit, when we’d talked about the artistic bench installed, then removed, from along the new stretch of the Downtown Greenway in that area. Neighbors said the bench attracted drug addicts and prostitutes.

The guys on The Block dismissed that notion. One said: “The problem is not as serious as they say it is on the news. And the bench has nothing to do with it.”

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